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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffLum Edwards Date: Oct 17, 2006 4:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: BARTON HALL REVISITED

Are you Talking about 05-08-77? If so This became my favorite show so far ) a few days ago.(Admittedly I am Still newish and look forward to finding other favorites.) I love the "Fire on the Mountain" they played that night. Later, Lum.

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Poster: orchiddoctor Date: Oct 17, 2006 5:51am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: BARTON HALL REVISITED

Bah, humbug. Sorry to be the naysayer here, but Barton Hall epitomizes what went wrong with the post-retirement Dead. Too clean, too rehearsed, too predictable.

The debate about different periods in the dead's history will hopefully go on for years to come. Different configurations, different axes, different times--all add up to different bands. For me, the Dead is a group of scraggly bohemians who invented a form of American music which I would call psychedellic country rock. The period from late 1967--1972 (okay, 1974) saw an amazing amount of growth and development from a San Francisco experimental bar band into a mature, raging beast of a musical giant. Each period--e.g. 67-8, 69-70, late 1971-2, 73-4--marks a significant change in the band's style as it absorbed ideas from its own environment and added depth from without. This seemed to stop for the most part after the retirement.

To me, they became a nice sounding band without the same fly by the seat of your pants fire they used to have. The prettification of the short tunes begun in 1971 became central to their aesthetic at the expense of invention. Now, before you flame me, I don't mean to say that they sucked after 1972 (okay 1974), they just weren't as interesting or amazing. Sure, I wish I'd had tickets to Barton Hall, but I'm happier that I had tickets to 1967 shows at the Cafe Au GoGo, Feb 11-14 1970, April 25-29, 1971, March 1972 at the Academy, and dozens more in between (including quite a few DP shows).

I guess, too, the Dead you saw was the Dead you liked most.
Besides, if you like 1977 Dead (and they are sweet), how can you pick just one from that year?

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffLum Edwards Date: Oct 22, 2006 8:28am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: BARTON HALL REVISITED

hiya orchiddoctor, Just found your reply from a few days ago, Like I said in my post I am still new here and havent listened to more than a few dozen shows. The Barton Hall Show was the first one where at the end I thought Damn, I have been in a trance for a while. not thinking about anything at all just listening to the music. I am quite sure there are many other 77 shows as good, I just havent found them. I am just now sampling 80's shows. Lum

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Poster: orchiddoctor Date: Oct 22, 2006 11:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: BARTON HALL REVISITED

Don't get me wrong: 1977 is a sweet year. While the out-of the-gate jamming may be gone, the playing is clean and tight. I love many of the tunes introduced at that time--I love Blues for Allah.

But that reworked St. Stephen . . . .